Are you related to Private John HENDERSON who served in the British Machine Gun Corps during World War 1?

British-Flag

Are you related to a British soldier named John HENDERSON who served in the British Army during the Great War?  The man whose descendants we are looking for served in the Machine Gun Corps and Medals Gone Missing Chief Researcher, Sandra Smith indicates that five (5) men by that name served in this unit during 1914-1918.

In particular, John HENDERSON of the Machine Gun Corps who is subject of our search had the Service Number 127323 and the good news is that he survived the conflict – and does not appear on the Commonwealth War Graves List of those who died during the Great War.

The Great War cap badge of the British Machine Gun Corps, showing the Crown over crossed Vickers Guns. Image courtesy of the website British Military Badges U.K.

The Great War cap badge of the British Machine Gun Corps, showing the Crown over crossed Vickers Guns. Image courtesy of the website British Military Badges U.K.

One of John’s war service medals has appeared in Australia, so is it possible that John or one of his descendants emigrated to the southern hemisphere post war?

Sandra states “This is going to be a tough one to crack as most of UK World War 1 Service Records were destroyed by Hitler’s bombing during the blitz circa 1940” so we are hoping that somebody out there is searching for John’s medals?

PLEASE NOTE:- This medal is NOT for general sale and will only be returned to a next of kin upon very strict proof of relationship.

Name: John Henderson
Military Year: 1914-1920
Rank: Private
Medal Awarded: British War Medal and Victory Medal
Regiment or Corps: Machine Gun Corps
Regimental Number: 127323
Previous Units: 127323. M G C. Pte.

If you are related to John HENDERSON, please contact the Medals Gone Missing Administrator immediately as a window of opportunity may close (in early 2019) to recover this particular medal.

  • Delicious
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
Posted in Honour Roll - British Stories, Military Medals | Leave a comment

Mons Star trio are missing to BEF ‘Old Contemptibles’ James CARR – Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers – Can you help?

British-Flag

The family of James CARR, son of  William Carr and husband of Annie Carr, of John Street, Downpatrick, (County Down) are searching for his missing First World War Medals.

This medal set consists of the 1914 Star (colloquially referred to as the ‘Mons Star’), British War Medal and Victory Medal.  As such, James was part of the BEF (British Expeditionary Force) sent to the Western Front prior to the First Battle of Ypres in November 1914.

James CARR served with the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  Sadly he died in Mons on 26th August 1914.

The 1914 Star, colloquially referred to as the Mons Star.  It is a medal similar to this which was posthumously awarded to James CARR of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  His descendants are searching for any medals in his name.

The 1914 Star, colloquially referred to as the Mons Star. It is a medal similar to this which was posthumously awarded to James CARR of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. His descendants are searching for any medals in his name.

In terms of the original troops sent to the Western Front in the early days of the Great War, it has been said that Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany was famously dismissive of the BEF.  It has been claimed that he allegedly issued an order on 19 August 1914 to “exterminate … the treacherous English and walk over General French’s contemptible little army”.  Subsequently the survivors of the regular army who served prior to the end of 1914 dubbed themselves “The Old Contemptibles”, although no evidence of Kaiser Wilhelm II ever issuing such order has ever been found.

Any assistance to help my family to recover these missing medals would be very much appreciated.

  • Delicious
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
Posted in Military Medals | Leave a comment

Waterloo Medal of James SPARKES is sought by family – Can you help?

British-&-Australian-flags

Over the years, on many occasions we at Medals Gone Missing have heard ‘medal and militaria’ dealers remark “Well, the family did not want the medal and that is why they sold it to me”.  However that is often not the case at all.  Especially if that particular medal is sold by an elderly member of the family who can easily be manipulated or confused.  On the other hand, sometimes one “cousin” within a family may sell a set of family medals without telling the extended family (other cousins) that the medals have been placed on the open market.  The other family members then spend a great deal of their lives, trying to get those medals back!

An example of the Waterloo Medal, similar to that awarded to Footman James SPARKES.

An example of the Waterloo Medal, similar to that awarded to Footman James SPARKES.

One such case is the missing Waterloo Medal awarded to James SPARKES who served in the British Army during this action.  A descendant who now resides in Australia, of James SPARKES contacted MGM and stated “My grandmother was in possession of the medal of which James was her grandfather.  Unfortunately she sold it to a collector or dealer in Sydney in the 1980’s and it breaks our heart to think that our grandmother thought she needed the money and had to sell the medal”.  The medal was sold for a measly $50 AUD and whilst the medals market was vastly different back then …. I still cannot help but form the opinion that perhaps this “purchaser” knew they were getting the deal of the century!

As with most Waterloo medals, the name of the recipient is engraved on the edge.  This descendant went on to say “We believe that our great, great grandfather’s medal could be inscribed ‘James Sparkes’, however I have a memory that the medal may in fact be inscribed ‘Footman Sparkes’.  It would be wonderful if whoever has this medal would consider selling it back to our family and we sincerely hope to hear back from the collector who has the medal in their safekeeping”.  So if you have owned or seen a medal engraved “Footman Sparkes” …. or “James Sparkes’ then we would love to hear from you.

If you are a collector who has this medal in your collection, it is asked that you kindly consider selling the medal back to the descendants of James SPARKES.  The family has indicated they are well aware of the commercial value of the medal and hold no illusions that they will not be able to purchase it back for the same price that it was sold.  At the very least, it would be very sporting if the person who has this missing Waterloo Medal informs MGM that the medal is safe and that they will give this family first option, should they decide to sell it in the future.

  • Delicious
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
Posted in Honour Roll - British Stories, Military Medals | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

First World War Victory Medal of Bertram Lawrence HERDON returned after 100 years in time for Centenary – ANZAC Memorial – Ancestry.com

British-Flag

The First World War Victory Medal of Major Bertram Lawrence HERDON has been returned after being missing for nearly 100 years, just in time for the Centenary of Remembrance Day.  The medal return took place at the ANZAC Memorial in Sydney Australia …. a long way from where Bertram served during the Great War.

Victory Medal awarded to then Lieutenant Bertram Lawrence HERDON who served with the Indian Army during the Great War. This medal was returned to his descendants nearly 100 years after the Great War ended.

Victory Medal awarded to then Lieutenant Bertram Lawrence HERDON who served with the Indian Army during the Great War. This medal was returned to his descendants nearly 100 years after the Great War ended.

Major Bertram HERDON served with the Indian Army during the First World War.   At this time, Bertram was a Lieutenant and his service on the Indian frontier meant that he was spared from the carnage that was the Western Front.

This Victory Medal was found during 2016 by a British medal collector Angus McLeod who was travelling through Krakow in Poland and saw the award pinned to a French uniform.  Knowing that the medal did not historically relate to that particular uniform, he managed through broken German to convince the shop owner to sell the medal separately.  When Angus returned to his home in Spain and began to research the medal recipient, he located details about Bertram Lawrence HERDON on the genealogy  website Ancestry.com and made contact.  The wonderful staff at Ancestry Australia made contact with Medals Gone Missing and this medal return then became a real international affair.

David HERDON of Australia is the great nephew of Bertram HERDON and Medals Gone Missing tracked him down using Ancestry’s resources; and the rest is history.  The medal was returned by Ancestry’s Jason Reeve at the ANZAC Memorial in Sydney, just in time for the Centenary of Remembrance Day.

Many thanks go out to Ancestry.com for this amazing piece of community service which proves they are not just into genealogy for the commercial interests.  As usual, Medals Gone Missing researcher extraordinaire Sandra Smith went above and beyond the call of duty to facilitate his medal return.

 

  • Delicious
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
Posted in Military Medals | Leave a comment

Medals Gone Missing & Ancestry.com assist Queensland Police with Stolen War Medals (669 N.C. NEVITT – 1st LIGHT HORSE BRIGADE)

Australian-Flag

When Queensland Police put out a call for help to find the owner of a set of stolen war medals, super sleuth and Chief Research Officer Sandra SMITH of Medals Gone Missing answered the call.  Proving that being in a different state is no barrier when you have the help of an organisation such as Ancestry.com behind you.  In fact, with resources such as those provided by Ancestry.com, we can help you no matter which part of the world you live!

The stolen war medal surrendered to Queensland Police. Medals Gone Missing helped return this 1914-1915 Star back to its rightful family.

The stolen war medal surrendered to Queensland Police. Medals Gone Missing helped return this 1914-1915 Star back to its rightful family.

The stolen war medals of Lieutenant Norman Crewe NEVITT were located in a garden near Redcliffe Hospital in Brisbane, Queensland.  The stolen medals were surrendered to Queensland Police in Redcliffe who made extensive inquiries with all persons whose surname matched – unfortunately with a negative result.  So in June 2018 the call for help went out Australia wide and luckily, Sandra heard a radio interview asking for assistance.  As usual, Sandra’s research backed by Ancestry.com turned up trumps and it was discovered that Lieutenant NEVITT had two daughters.  So upon discovering that one daughter married into a family named Papworth, the problem was solved and Sandra SMITH from Medals Gone Missing supplied Redcliffe Police with details of James Papworth ….. the grandson of Lieutenant Norman Crewe NEVITT.  Please click on this link to read the story put out on the myPoliceQueensland website.

When this stolen Victory Medal awarded to Lieutenant Norman Crewe NEVITT was surrendered to Queensland Police, Medals Gone Missing came to the fore and solved the mystery.

When this stolen Victory Medal awarded to Lieutenant Norman Crewe NEVITT was surrendered to Queensland Police, Medals Gone Missing came to the fore and solved the mystery.

According to records held at the Australian War Memorial (AWM) Norman NEVITT enlisted as a Private and was allocated the Service Number 669.  He was posted to the 1st Australian Light Horse Brigade Headquarters and rose through the ranks, gaining his commission as a Lieutenant.

It is stories such as this which prove that all hope is not lost – should you become the victim of some unscrupulous thief.  Medals Gone Missing were very proud to return the stolen war medals of Captain Harry KATEKAR way back in 2010 to his daughters.  The Second World War medals had been stolen 27 years earlier, so miracles do happen!  Should you lose your medals or become a victim of theft, simply report this matter to Police and then submit a listing with Medals Gone Missing.  With wonderful volunteers such as Sandra SMITH backing you up, you just never know when you will receive the call stating that your medals have been found.

The stolen war medals of Lieutenant NEVITT are returned by Police to his grandson James Papworth. Photo courtesy of Queensland Police.

The stolen war medals of Lieutenant NEVITT are returned by Police to his grandson James Papworth. Photo courtesy of Queensland Police.

  • Delicious
  • Facebook
  • Digg
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Twitter
Posted in Military Medals | Leave a comment