Missing War Medals of Sergeant (Flight Engineer) Victor GLEDHILL (RAFVR) sold at auction – Medals advertised via Medal News publication

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My family is searching for the missing war medals of our relative, Sergeant (Flight Engineer) Victor GLEDHILL. His service number was 1592716 and he served with 77 Squadron, R.A.F.V.R. (Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve). Victor GLEDHILL was killed in action on 17 June 1944, aged 19. According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission records, he lies buried in Uden War Cemetery in the Netherlands (Holland). His war medals were sold on 20 October 1993 at DNW AUCTIONS.

Sergeant Victor GLEDHILL of the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR)

Sergeant Victor GLEDHILL of the Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve (RAFVR)

This auction house (Dix Noonan Webb) was at 16 Bolton St, Mayfair, London, W1J 8BQ and as British medals from the Second World War were not engraved by the government, it is clear that the medals were identifiable by other documentation which accompanied the medals. The missing medals comprise of the 1939-1945 Star, France and Germany Star and the 1939-1945 War Medal.

The  missing war medals posthumously awarded to Sergeant Victor GLEDHILL. They consist of the 1939-1945 Star, France & Germany Star and 1939-1945 War Medal.  Sergeant Victor GLEDHILL was killed in action whilst serving with 77 Squadron RAFVR (Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve)

The missing war medals posthumously awarded to Sergeant Victor GLEDHILL. They consist of the 1939-1945 Star, France & Germany Star and 1939-1945 War Medal. Sergeant Victor GLEDHILL was killed in action whilst serving with 77 Squadron RAFVR (Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve)

They were sold together with the cardboard box of issue (which would have had the name of his father and address on the front) and condolence slip to his parents. Victor was the son of George Victor and Florence Gledhill, of Marsh, Huddersfield. We do not know how these missing war medals came to leave our family, but we would be very grateful if whoever purchased the medals would consider selling them back to us.

The following information is from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website:-  Uden was occupied by the Germans until its liberation in September 1944.  In the earlier years of the war Commonwealth and Allied servicemen were buried in the garden of the parish priest which adjoined the Roman Catholic Cemetery.  Later it became necessary to provide another burial ground for them and in 1943 the municipality acquired the Roman Catholic Cemetery, unused since about 1918, for this purpose.  After the war more than 100 graves from the garden of the parish priest, and also a number of isolated graves from various parts of the commune, were moved into this cemetery.  Uden War Cemetery now contains 701 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War (two of them unidentified) and two Polish war graves.

Commonwealth War Graves Commission photograph of Uden War Cemetery in the Netherlands (Holland).

Commonwealth War Graves Commission photograph of Uden War Cemetery in the Netherlands (Holland).

This medal set has been advertised in the wonderful international medal publication, Medal News (March 2014 edition).   Should you know of the whereabouts of these missing war medals, please contact the Medals Gone Missing Administrator via email customerservice@medalsgonemissing.com

The March 2014 edition of Medal News magazine.  This publication is an excellent resource regarding medals and military awards and is highly recommended.

The March 2014 edition of Medal News magazine. This publication is an excellent resource regarding medals and military awards and is highly recommended.

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Medal of Honor awarded to Captain Edmond BUTLER – battle of Wolf Mountain, Montana on 8 January 1877

AMERICAN-FLAGThe descendants of U.S. Army Medal of Honor recipient, Captain Edmond BUTLER are wishing to ascertain the location of this missing medal. Edmond BUTLER was awarded the Medal of Honor as a result of his participation in the battle of Wolf Mountain, Montana on 8 January 1877. He served with the 5th Infantry during this iconic battle. The Battle of Wolf Mountain, also known the Battle of the Wolf Mountains, Miles’s Battle on the Tongue River and the Battle of the Butte; occurred January 8, 1877, in the Montana Territory between the United States Army and a force of Lakota Sioux and Northern Cheyenne during the Great Sioux War of 1876. The Northern Cheyenne called it the Battle of Belly Butte. It was fought about four miles southwest of modern-day Birney, along the Tongue River.

Medal of Honor recipient Captain Edmond BUTLER (later Lieutenant Colonel) who served with the 5th Army at the battle of Wolf Mountain.

Medal of Honor recipient Captain Edmond BUTLER (later Lieutenant Colonel) who served with the 5th Army at the battle of Wolf Mountain.

Mary Casey, the family historian states “My Great Grandfather, Edmond Butler, from County Tipperary, Ireland, came to America and fought in our Civil War. He then fought in the Indian Wars and earned the Medal of Honor after the Battle of Wolf Mountain, Montana on January 8, 1877. He was in the Army, 5th Infantry. The Medal disappeared years ago and I have heard it is in a private collection”. Mary and her family fully appreciate that sometimes, collectors do not wish to part with their collection. They are also very grateful that these collectors treasure these medals and look after them, as if they are their own. They would be extremely grateful, just to know where the medal is? Mary went on to say, “Of course, our family would dearly love to have this medal returned to us, as our family has a very strong military tradition, we are certainly a military family. Captain Edmond Butler’s sons, grandsons, great grandsons, great great grandsons and great,great, great grandsons have fought for this country over many years and in many conflicts. The latest being in Vietnam, South Korea, Iraq and Afghanistan”.

Medal of Honour

The U.S. Medal of Honor, similar to that awarded to Captain Edmond BUTLER of the 5th Army. The descendants of Edmond BUTLER believe that this missing medal may be in the hands of a private collector. They are hoping this person may be kind enough to allow them to view this medal which was awarded to their ancestor.

Mary went on to say, “The missing Medal of Honor means a lot to our family and with the military history I have included, I am sure that whoever has been caring for this medal will appreciate that we are very genuine. If you are the person who has Edmond’s medal, we would be extremely grateful even just to view the medal. If you would consider selling it back to us, that would be even better; but we fully understand your position and we respect your love for the Medal of Honor. We hope to hear from you in the near future.

The history of our great grandfather is recorded and his information is recorded in Wikipedia.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmond_Butler Edmond Butler was born in Ireland and immigrated to the United States as a young man. Shortly after arriving in Brooklyn, New York, he enlisted in the U.S. Army and commissioned as a second lieutenant in the 5th U.S. Infantry in October 1861. He was also assigned to special duty with the inspector of volunteer units in Kansas and Missouri.

In 1862, he was sent to the New Mexico Territory and later assisted in the reconstruction of Fort Bliss after its recapture by the Union. Promoted to captain in 1864, he was eventually reassigned to Fort Wingate, New Mexico and, in 1865, commanded an expedition against the Navajos living in Canyon de Chelly. Intercepting a Navajo raiding party under Manuelito Grande, he recovered a number of sheep and other livestock taken from the neighboring Apache. After a period of 22 days, in which he had covered 720 miles, 31 Navajos were killed while another 27 were captured. He was also involved in the relocation of 3,000 Navajo to the Fort Sumner Reservation on the Pecos River.

Transferred to Kansas in 1866, he spent two years there before being assigned to the Beecher Island-site in December 1868 to bring in the bodies of the soldiers killed during the Battle of Beecher Island. Despite a large Sioux presence in the area, Butler successfully removed the bodies from the site despite being “under the fire of the main body of Sioux”.[attribution needed] However, he was unable to find the remains of Lieutenant Fredrick H. Beecher and Acting Surgeon J.H. Mooer, suggesting their bodies had been removed by the Sioux “probably in revenge for rifling Sioux graves on the Republican (earlier by camp followers)”.[attribution needed]

During 1869, while assigned to guard the Fort Wallace–Denver stage route, Butler volunteered to join an expedition under Lieutenant Colonel Charles R. Woods against the Pawnees.

Returning to Kansas in October 1871, he was assigned to operations to control “organized land-leaguers”[attribution needed] in the southeast. Three years later, he served with Lieutenant General Nelson A. Miles during the Red River Campaign and in the Black Hills War in which he led six companies in pursuit of Sitting Bull. Although Sitting Bull and Gall escaped to Canada, he was involved in the capture of eight other Sioux chieftains and around 700 lodges.

On January 8, 1877, Butler took part in the engagement against the Sioux at Wolf Mountain. In command of Company C, he was commended for his actions during the battle for “conspicuous gallantry in leading his command against greatly superior numbers of hostile Indians, strongly entrenched” and receiving a brevet of major and officially awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Later that year, he escorted Chief Joseph and other Nez Perce to Fort Buford between October and November 1877. During the early 1880s, he was stationed at Fort Snelling, Minnesota and Fort Keogh, Montana and guarded construction parties of the Northern Pacific Railroad. He also held numerous staff positions and eventually awarded the rank of lieutenant colonel shortly before his retirement on March 9, 1891. He died in Trouville, France three years later and, his body being returned to the United States, later buried in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Omaha, Nebraska.

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Missing Dog Tags of Warrant Officer Albert Robertson Fowlie – New Zealand Army Service Corps sought by family – New Caledonia

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Albert Robertson Fowlie, New Zealand Territorial Service and Army Service Corps, 1934 to 1944.

Warrant Officer Albert Robertson Fowlie of the New Zealand Army Service Corps, World War Two

Warrant Officer Albert Robertson Fowlie of the New Zealand Army Service Corps, during the Second World War. His service number was 582471 and his family is seeking his dog tags that went missing in Noumea. Can you help?

Bert Fowlie was born in Scotland during 1909 and at an early age, travelled with his parents to New Zealand where the family settled in the North Island town of Dargaville.  In 1934, he joined the 1st North Auckland Battalion for Territorial Service where he rose to Warrant Officer Class 2, then at the beginning of 1943 he saw war time service in a unit attached to the New Zealand Army Service Corps. The unit formed part of the New Zealand 3rd Division and in April 1943, his unit was shipped off to New Caledonia.
… and this is where the story of “Medals Gone Missing” begins. The story is not long and may not have an ending, but here it is for the record.

My father married a local Dargaville lass and they had two sons.  As he died relatively young in 1960 and did not speak much about his war service to us. We do not have too many memories of his time in New Caledonia, but there is the one story that has survived.

Noumea, New Caledonia circa 1943.  Albert Robertson Fowlie served here during the Second World War with the N.Z. Army Service Corps.

Noumea, New Caledonia circa 1943. Albert Robertson Fowlie served here during the Second World War with the N.Z. Army Service Corps.

One hot tropical day, Bert and a group of his army mates went swimming on a beach near their camp.  When they came back, they found that their belongings had been “gone through” and his dog tags were missing.  Not sure if others suffered the same fate.  He said the GI’s (American troops – G.I. being slang for Government Issue) on the island were like “magpies” and would pick up anything bright and shiny.  I have to say for my many U.S. friends that maybe the assumption that it was GI’s could be wrong; magpies can come in many forms, but this is as I recall of the story.  While dog tags are not medals, for military people they are an important part of their identity.

Most soldiers, rightly or wrongly brought back souvenirs of their wartime experiences. Our father was no different. His token of service was /is an inert and safe 37MM-M16 casing dating from 1942 and this still survives in the family.

New Zealand recruitment poster during the Second World War.

New Zealand recruitment poster during the Second World War.

My father’s name was Albert Robertson Fowlie and his service number 582471.  My brother and I have a copy of his service record and do have his medals from the New Zealand Ministry Of Defence, so that is something to remember him by.  He served in New Caledonia as a sergeant from 30 April 1943 to 20 April 1944, was most likely stationed in the northern part of the island and then in the Noumea area before returning to New Zealand and discharge to essential industry – the New Zealand Railways, where he served until his death in 1960 at the age of 51.  Our mother survived through to marry again after his death and outlived her second husband; finally departing from us in 2012 at the tender age of 97 years.

Is there a remote possibility that there may be someone out there who knows about Bert’s missing dog tags?  With that in mind, can I ask for any assistance that may provide a lead to tracing them? I can imagine that they are long gone, but who knows – worth a try.  If  by any chance you have any Second World War memorabilia that has been closited away and may not be from a family returned serviceman or veteran, take another look at them in detail.  This website is a really good place where you may start to find out more about them.

Second World War dogtags, similar to those of Albert Robertson Fowlie.  If you have any dog tags to this man in your collection, please contact the Medals Gone Missing Administrator.

Second World War dogtags, similar to those of Albert Robertson Fowlie. If you have any dog tags to this man in your collection, please contact the Medals Gone Missing Administrator.

For anyone wanting to know more about the New Zealand 3rd Division and ASC (Army Service Corps) activities in New Caledonia during World War II, take a look at the New Zealand Electronic Text Collection hosted by Victoria University, Wellington.

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Missing Afghanistan Campaign Medals awarded to Anthony P. CLARKE accidentilly lost. Can you please help?

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The service medals of an Australian veteran who served in the Afghanistan campaign have tragically gone missing.  And it is hoped that some kind soul has found these medals and is searching for their rightful owner.

Australian Engineer Anthony P. CLARKE, service number 8526842 was awarded the Australian Active Service Medal with ICAT clasp, Afghanistan Medal and the Australian Defence Medal during 2010.  The ICAT clasp relates to the International Coalition Against Terrorism.  Having served his country, Anthony CLARKE returned to Australia and unfortunately the medals appear to have become missing a short time later.  My family has no idea as to where these medals may have been misplaced and we fear that they have been lost whilst moving house.  Any assistance in helping me to recover these missing medals which are of deep sentimental value would be greatly appreciated.

IMAGE RIGHT:  Afghanistan-trioDigital images of the missing medals awarded to A.P. CLARKE who served in the Australian Defence Force during the conflict in Afghanistan.  The medals are from left to right:- Australian Active Service Medal with ICAT clasp.  Afghanistan Medal and the Australian Defence Medal.  Lost whilst moving house, these medals are of strong sentimental value.

Anthony CLARKE is one of many young Australians who as a result of service in Afghanistan, have joined the ranks of men and women to have served their country during a time of war.  The least that we can do as a nation to show our gratitude for his service is to help recover these missing war medals.

If anybody has found these medals, could they please be kind enough to contact the Medals Gone Missing Administrator on phone 0449 692401 or hand them in to the nearest R.S.L, Australian Defence Force base or Police Station.

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One Chance in a Million – missing British War Medal of Charles Gilbert SMITH found on Ebay in time for Centenary of First World War – Victory Medal still missing.

Australian-FlagHave you ever tried to locate a person when their surname is SMITH?  Then try to locate a missing First World War medal for what is arguably the most common surname in the western world.

Medals Gone Missing will be the first to admit that searching for any missing war medal, regardless of the surname is often a needle in a haystack.  Luck (some would say fate?) often has something to do with any success.  So in the case of a British War Medal awarded to Charles Gilbert SMITH, perhaps it was a combination of luck and good management?

British-War-Medal-CentenaryIMAGE RIGHT:  A British War Medal, similar to that awarded to 4409 Private Charles Gilbert SMITH of the 31st Infantry Battalion, AIF (Australian Imperial Force).

According to the First World War Embarkation Roll, Charles Gilbert SMITH departed Australia’s shores on the 17th November, 1917 from Port Brisbane aboard HMAT Kyarra (A55).  As such, his full medal entitlement consisted of the British War Medal and the 1914-1918 Victory Medal.  These medals were apparently given by a relative to a person who was not connected to the family; complete with the uniform that Charles wore at the end of World War One.

In May 2011, Ken SMITH of New South Wales submitted a listing for his great grandfather’s missing war medals.   The listing on the Medals Gone Missing website was a nine dollar investment and for his money, Ken was buying hope.  Hope that one day, these missing medals would be found.

Medals Gone Missing searches the eBay auction site, amongst others mediums on a daily basis – 365 days per year.  So it is only fair to say that vigilance such as this is sometimes rewarded with a positive result.  In this instance, the name of Charles Gilbert SMITH jumped out at us on the 30th July 2013 and we made immediate contact with Ken.  With only hours to spare, Ken Smith made the decision to undertake the bidding himself.  He was not to be outdone and was successful in winning back his great grandfather’s missing British War Medal.  There were 28 bids on this one particular medal!  Well done Ken!

Nick-and-Connor-Smith-BritiIMAGE LEFT:  Nick and Connor SMITH holding the British War Medal of their great – great grandfather.  Their father, Ken Smith submitted a 5 year listing on the MGM website.  Two years later, we found this missing medal being offered for sale on ebay.  With only hours to spare, we contacted Ken who preferred to make the winning bid himself.  The medal is now safely back with the descendants of Charles Gilbert SMITH.

It is extremely humbling when a family shows such sincere gratitude.  The Medals Gone Missing Administrator was tickled pink to received the following email:-

Dear Gary,

I would like to once again thank you for your help in locating the British War Medal that belonged to my great grandfather (Charles Gilbert Smith 4409).  The medal has arrived back to the family and we are all thrilled beyond words.  I’ve attached a photo of two of Charlie’s great, great grandchildren with the medal, and I think that the smile on their faces says it all.
To be honest, I never really expected that we would find any of Charlie’s items from the war, and to actually be able to hold this has made us all very happy indeed.  I can say with some certainty, that this medal has not been seen in the family since before Charlie’s death in 1927.  So it has been missing for (at least) eighty six years.
The only other certainty is that without the help of Medals Gone Missing, this medal would never have been found. ….. Let’s hope we can locate the Victory Medal that is still out there too.  Without your help we would not have known about the auction and it would been lost again for years.  Incidentally, the medal is in perfect condition!
All the best,
Ken Smith and family

It is success stories like this which motivate us and I am very pleased that this branch of the SMITH family now have a tangible reminder of one man’s service.

With the Centenary of the First World War upon us, for the sake of a $9 listing you too can tell the world via the Medals Gone Missing website that you are looking for the missing war medals of your ancestor.  It is similar to winning lotto.  If you do not buy a ticket, then you have zero chance of winning.  The same goes for Medals Gone Missing.  If you do not have a listing on the website, then you stand little chance of having your missing war medals returned to their rightful place.

NOTE:  Medals Gone Missing is a NOT FOR PROFIT organisation.  Listing fees are used to maintain this site on the worldwide web.  Our Paypal and Bank Account is always open for scrutiny by any party to ensure accountability.

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Posted in Honour Roll - Australian Stories, Military Medals, Missing Militaria - Now Found! | Tagged | Leave a comment