Commemorating the men of HMAS Kuttabul – 75th Anniversary Cruise – March Newsletter

British-&-Australian-flagsMarch newsletter

Please click on the ABOVE LINK to view our March newsletter.

The 75th Anniversary of the Japanese midget submarine attack upon Sydney Harbour is just two months away. #HMASKuttabul #Japanesemidgetsubmarine #SydneyHarbour

On 31st May 2017 we shall commemorate the 21 allied sailors who lost their life aboard HMAS Kuttabul during the Japanese midget submarine attack. View our newsletter to learn more.

On 31st May 2017 we shall commemorate the 21 allied sailors who lost their life aboard HMAS Kuttabul during the Japanese midget submarine attack. View our newsletter to learn more.

  • – PAGE 1:- On 31st May 2017 we shall board the ‘Bella Vista’ for a four hour Sydney Harbour cruise bound for HMAS Kuttabul and lay a wreath on the water near where the depot ship was lost.  A Royal Australian Navy bugler will sound the Last Post and Historian Steven Carruthers will take us back to that night in 1942 when war came to Sydney.
  • – PAGE 2:- Tragically 21 allied sailors lost their lives, but amid the turmoil and horror of that night, some men survived against the odds.  Read the story of Stoker Ray MAJOR (service number B2993) as told by Historian Steven Carruthers.
  • – PAGE 3:- Tickets are now on sale for the Kuttabul Commemoration cruise to take place on Wednesday 31st May; 75 years to the day when Japanese midget submarines stole into Sydney Harbour.
Stoker Ray MAJOR survived the sinking of HMAS Kuttabul and thankfully went on to live a full life. Read about Ray in our March letter by scrolling to the top of this blog and clicking on the link titled 'March newsletter'

Stoker Ray MAJOR survived the sinking of HMAS Kuttabul and thankfully went on to live a full life. Read about Ray by scrolling to the top of this blog and clicking on the link titled ‘March newsletter’

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Posted in HMAS Kuttabul, Honour Roll - Australian Stories, Honour Roll - Japanese Stories, Military Medals | Leave a comment

Kuttabul Commemoration – 75th Anniversary Japanese midget submarine attack upon Sydney Harbour – April Newsletter

Australian-FlagApril newsletter 1

Please click on the ABOVE LINK to view our April newsletter No. 1.

The 75th Anniversary of the Japanese midget submarine attack upon Sydney Harbour is less than two months away. #Kuttabul #Japanesemidgetsubmarine #SydneyHarbour

Can you help us find the descendants of these missing Kuttabul crew members? Please view the April newsletter for a list of names.

Can you help us find the descendants of these missing Kuttabul crew members? Please view the April newsletter for a list of names.

CONTENTS OF APRIL NEWSLETTER:

  • – PAGE 1:- Eight sailors still missing (tracing the descendants of the 21 Kuttabul sailors who tragically lost their lives when the Japanese midget subs attacked.
  • – PAGE 2:- How we found the descendants of Herbert Arthur SMITH
  • – PAGE 3:- Horace Beazley – escaped death twice that fateful night.
  • – PAGE 4:- What happened to the Japanese torpedoes? (part 1)
  • – PAGE 5:- Kuttabul Commemoration Cruise on Sydney Harbour 31st May.  Tickets now on sale.

The Kuttabul Commemoration Project is an organization run by volunteers whose mission is to commemorate the 21 allied sailors and 1 allied airman who lost their lives in the defense of Sydney from 31st May to 8th June, 1942.

Was your ancestor (great-grandfather, grandfather or father) billeted or assigned to the depot ship HMAS Kuttabul at the time of the Japanese midget submarine attack upon Sydney Harbour?  Whether he was on board Kuttabul at the time of the attack or away from the vessel on leave, we would like to hear from you.  Please contact Gary Traynor on email 044 969 2401 or email customerservice@medalsgonemissing.com and tell us his story.

Alternatively visit our Facebook page titled Kuttabul Commemoration Project.

Read about Able Seaman Horace Charlton BEAZLEY (pictured below) by scrolling to the top of this story and clicking on the link titled ‘April newsletter 1’

S/5769 Horace Charlton BEAZLEY who narrowly escaped death on two seperate occasions during the Japanese midget submarine attack upon Sydney Harbour.

S/5769 Horace Charlton BEAZLEY who narrowly escaped death on two seperate occasions during the Japanese midget submarine attack upon Sydney Harbour.

 

 

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Zulu Historian to visit South Coast of New South Wales – Free Seminar

British-Flag

It appears that nothing stirs the imagination; or invokes romantic notion more than acts of Colonial heroism in the face of overwhelming odds.  Indeed, the tragedy of Isandlwana in Zululand during January of 1879 is one such action which encapsulates the “boy’s own” impression of glorious misfortune.  However the opinion of “fortune” …. or “misfortune” all depends on which end of the Assegai you stood?  The boy in me cheered the cowboys during days of old and jeered the Indians in films about the wild west.  The adult in me sees things a little differently now.

Scene from the 1979 film Zulu Dawn

Scene from the 1979 film Zulu Dawn

So if you are an avid fan of the original 1964 film ‘Zulu’ starring Michael Caine and Stanley Baker …. and the prequel “Zulu Dawn” then you will no doubt enjoy the opportunity to hear the real story about the battles for Isandlwana and Rorke’s Drift.  Both fact and popular fiction.

The 1964 film 'Zulu' which many would be familiar with.

The 1964 film ‘Zulu’ which many would be familiar.

Whilst he hails from Australia, Historian Ray Greenfield is an expert on the Anglo-Zulu conflict.  Ray has conducted an in depth study of the Zulu Wars for over twenty years.  He has also walked the battlefields in Africa on a number of occasions to gain a comprehensive understanding and lay of the land.  Medals Gone Missing is very proud to announce that Ray will be visiting the south coast of New South Wales in 2017 and is prepared to share his vast knowledge and passion for this fascinating piece of history.

If you are interested in attending a free seminar featuring the battles for Isandlwana and Rorke’s Drift, please email Medals Gone Missing on customerservice@medalsgonemissing.com or telephone Administrator Gary Traynor on 044 969 2401 to register your interest.  Date and venue to be advised and is dependent upon demand.

The South Africa Medal of 1880, commonly referred to as the 'Zulu War' Medal.

The South Africa Medal of 1880, commonly referred to as the ‘Zulu War’ Medal.

 

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Private Wallace Frederick WILSON – First World War medals missing – Can You Help?

British-FlagOne family has been on a journey of discovery.  The good news – finally the truth of what happened to their Great, Great Uncle has now been revealed and his exact medal entitlement confirmed.  The sad news – like hundreds of thousands of families around the world …. the war medals and Memorial Plaque are missing.

Private Wallace Frederick WILSON, Service Number 201212 of the 4th Battalion, Essex Regiment lost his life during the Great War.  Formerly 20799 Private Wallace Frederick WILSON of the Bedfordshire Regiment, his descendants are now armed with the knowledge that he was posthumously awarded the 1914-1915 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal.  Until recently, they had no idea he had served in the Dardenelles campaign – commonly referred to as Gallipoli.  As a result of his tragic death in another theatre of war, Wallace was commemorated with a Memorial Plaque, Scroll and letter from the King.

The 1914-1915 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal, similar to that posthumously awarded to Private Wallace Frederick WILSON

The 1914-1915 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal, similar to that posthumously awarded to Private Wallace Frederick WILSON

Born Wallace Frederick WILSON,  the only son of Berry Alfred and Mary Jane WILSON, of Broughton Huntingdonshire, he made the ultimate sacrifice during the first Battle of Gaza, Palestine.   His great, great nephew Jamie said, “The last few years I have been researching my great great uncle.  He is on the war memorial in Broughton Cemetery (Huntingdon) the village where I grew up . It was very strange because none of my relatives, even the older ones knew anything about him.  We had all been assuming he had died during the Somme battles on the Western Front!  Anyway after a big break I discovered his soldier number and discovered he died in the first battle of Gaza during 1917”.

Suvla Bay, Gallipoli as seen from The Nek at dawn on 7 August 2015 during the Centenary Commemorations of the August Offensive.  Photo taken by Medals Gone Missing.

Suvla Bay, Gallipoli as seen from The Nek at dawn on 7 August 2015 during the Centenary Commemorations of the August Offensive. Photo taken by Medals Gone Missing.

Jamie quizzed his extended family as to the whereabouts of the missing war service medals however nobody in the family had any knowledge of their location.  It was believed he was entitled only to the British War Medal and the Victory Medal,  having began his service life with the Bedfordshire Regiment.   Jamie explained,  “Wallace first served with the 1/4th Battalion during August 1914 in Brentwood.  Part of the Essex Brigade in the East Anglian Division.  He moved to Norwich in late 1914 and on to Colchester in April of 1915.  In May of 1915 the formation became the 161st Brigade in 54th (East Anglian) Division.  From Saint Albans on 21 July 1915 they sailed from Devonport for the Gallipoli campaign, via Lemnos.  His unit landed at Suvla Bay 12 August 1915 as a part of the offensive to push inland.   On 4 December 1915 Wallace was evacuated from Gallipoli and moved to Mudros, then going on to Alexandria on 17 December 1915.  Wallace Remained in the Egypt-Palestine theatre of operations thereafter and his Soldier Number was changed to 201212”.  So this vital information revealed that Wallace was also entitled to the 1914-1915 Star.

Jamie credits much of this information which came as quite a surprise to himself and his relatives, to the Essex Regiment Museum .  Sandra SMITH – Senior Research Officer with Medals Gone Missing says “It is wonderful when families such as this can unlock the past and finally discover what happened to their ancestors.  That all of this information would come to light in time for the Centenary of the Gallipoli August Offensive is an extra bonus for them.  We often associate the Sinai Palestine campaign with units such as the Light Horse and Imperial Camel Corps.  However this story is a sad and timely reminder that the poor ol’ British infantrymen were scattered to the four corners of the world and lost their lives in many faraway lands”.

In terms of the missing war medals and Memorial Plaque, Jamie states “None of my family have his medals or know where they are. I would love to find them on behalf of my family before 2017, the Centenary of his death”.

Commonwealth War Graves Commission photograph of the Jerusalem War Cemetery where Private Wallace Frederick WILSON was laid to rest.  His Memorial Plaque is missing.  Can you help?

Commonwealth War Graves Commission photograph of the Jerusalem War Cemetery where Private Wallace Frederick WILSON was laid to rest. His Memorial Plaque is missing. Can you help?

Wallace Frederick WILSON lost his life on the 26th of March, 1917.  If you have these medals or Memorial Plaque in your collection …. or know of their whereabouts, his descendants would be extremely grateful to have them returned.  Can you help?

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Private Walter SNOWDEN – Service Number 19316 – Lincolnshire Regiment

British-FlagMy family is attempting to locate the missing First World War Victory Medal of our great uncle, Private Walter SNOWDEN.

The Victory Medal of Private Walter SNOWDEN of the Lincolnshire Regiment is missing.  Can you help?

The Victory Medal of Private Walter SNOWDEN of the Lincolnshire Regiment is missing. Can you help?

We are in possession of his British War Medal, but we believe the Victory Medal went to Australia in the 1950’s with his sister, our great auntie Annie (nee Snowden). Walter SNOWDEN had the service number 19316, and was a member of the Lincolnshire Regiment. Walter survived the war but died of his wounds 20 years later at the age of 40. He lived in Sheffield and Epworth in England, possibly other places as well. We would be very happy to learn that the Victory medal is still in family hands. That would be great news especially if it had a lot of sentimental meaning to them. If however the medal is in the hands of a collector / dealer we would be very interested in purchasing the medal. He was only entitled to the standard First World War pair. Both myself and my brother have served in the British Army and this medal is of tremendous importance to us.

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