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Militaria Recently Sold

E.T.LEISHMAN
Gallipoli Historical Tours

UNIFORM & KIT ISSUED TO THE AIF DURING WW2

This pictorial library is devoted to the recording of "Uniform and Kit" issued to an Australian Soldier of any corps, during the Second World War. Consider it a virtual "Q" Store in Australian militaria. It is not exhaustive and will be added to over time. Any reader who wishes to contribute photographs and text will be recognised and credited with such information. I also invite collectors of other nation's militaria to forward content (please see our other countries listed on the drop down menu) - so that a comprehensive list of "Axis" and "Allies" uniform/kit is detailed.

 

Mark II Pattern Water Bottle Carrier

The design of the Mark II Pattern Water Bottle Carrier is a relic of the pre-World War One era. This particular style of water bottle carrier was subject to patent for Military service in 1905; having been modified from a previous design that came into existance two years earlier. Consisting of a leather 'skeleton' or cradle, the carrier is suspended on an adjustable leather strap with quarter inch roller "half buckle" and tongue, fashioned from brass or steel. This strap is topped by a canvas or cotton shoulder brace. They are almost always stamped with a maker's name and date of manufacture. It is also not uncommon to find items; issued during World War Two - with First World War dates. Another point of interest, is the fact that many Servicemen and women inscribed or stamped their names and/or serial numbers onto the carriers. A water bottle, issued to SX3558 Lance Sergeant Stanley Wilfred SEATON circa 1940; was returned to his daughter by the Medals Gone Missing Administrator in 2008. Over sixty years after it was issued to her father! You can find out more about this in our SUCCESS STORIES webpage by CLICKING HERE. Looked after, they are a very resilient piece of kit and are still commonly found and traded at Arms Fairs or online auction sites. The blue enamelled steel waterbottle is a Mark VI waterbottle with woollen cover. (This photo courtesy of the Kokoda Historical Collection). Wish to learn more about this piece of kit?  Visit our story on one particular waterbottle carrier which was issued multiple times during it's service life.   PLEASE CLICK HERE 

Pattern 37 Water Bottle Carrier with Belt Attachment

The Canadian Government had a very extensive textile capability; and as a result many items of Pattern 37 Web Equipment were exported. Australia in particular, received vast amounts of Canadian equipment. This carried on until such time as the Australian Government itself began production from 1943 onwards. The Australians produced a carrier, based on the standard Pattern 37 skeleton - however with a wider horizontal strap. This wider brace was fitted with two brass hooks, which provided the ability to fixing the water bottle carrier to the standard Pattern 37 waist belt. In keeping with this, much of the existing stock of water bottle carriers were modified to allow this same capability. This photograph clearly shows the extra web piece with two brass hooks, which facilitate the fixing of the waterbottle carrier to a standard Pattern 37 web belt.

Steel Enamelled Cup (blue)

This type of steel enamelled cup is the type issued to Australian Troops in all theatres of war. The enamelled finish on this particular cup is light grey with a dark grey 'fleck'. However this is not the only colour of this type of vessal and the finish is dependant upon the company of manufacture. The cup bears the government stamping of a 'D' broad arrow 'D' on the base. This photo courtesy of the Kokoda Historical Collection.

Steel Enamelled Cup (green)

The steel enamelled cup in a green finish. Slightly larger in dimensions to the blue enamelled cup, clearly it is consistent in design and no doubt fitted the criteria as laid down by the Departement of Defence for a basic service drinking cup. It is evident that it was more than likely produced by a different manufacturer. This photo courtesy of the Kokoda Historical Collection.

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